Copyright

Previous Page

~

~

The Long Gray Line

~

Opening credits prologue: The United States Military Academy at West Point is 153 years old. This is the TRUE STORY of an enlisted man who was there for 50 of those years. His name is Marty Maher.

~

The Long Gray Line (1955) Director: John Ford Writers: Edward Hope (screenplay), Marty Maher (based upon "Bringing Up the Brass" 

Stars: Tyrone Power, Maureen O'Hara, Robert Francis, Donald Crisp

~

The life story of a salt-of-the-earth Irish immigrant, who becomes an Army Noncommissioned Officer and spends his 50 year career at the United States Military Academy at West Point. This includes his job-related experiences as well as his family life and the relationships he develops with young cadets with whom he befriends. Based on the life of a real person.

~

The Long Gray Line is based on the life of Martin "Marty" Maher, Jr. (25 June 1876 17 January 1961). Maher was an Irish immigrant from Ballycrine, County Tipperary, Ireland, who joined the United States Army in 1898 and rose to the rank of Master Sergeant. He served as a revered and beloved swimming instructor at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, from 1899 to 1928.

~

Maher retired from the Army in 1928 and stayed at West Point as a civil service (civilian) employee in the athletic department and retired from that in 1946, completing 50 years of service at "The Point" (including two years as a waiter prior to his enlistment). Maher was named an honorary member of the classes of 1912, 1926 and 1928.

~

His autobiography, Bringing Up The Brass: My 55 Years at West Point, cowritten by Nardi Reeder Campion, was published in 1951 by David McKay Company Inc. and was the source of the film.

Maher died on 17 January 1961, at the age of 84 and is buried in the West Point Cemetery. 

~

Details Country: USA Language: English | Irish
Release Date: 9 February 1955 (USA) Also Known As: John Ford's
The Long Gray Line Filming Locations: United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, USA

Location filming at West Point was done during the summer when most cadets were gone with the exception of new "Plebes" so as not to disrupt normal activities. 

~

Maureen O'Hara says a prayer in the Irish language in the film.


History and Entertainment Meet Film

Review: 1 April 2001 | by Jeffreyna

I am a third year (Cow) cadet at West Point, and everything in this movie inspired me to start my West Point career. Witnessing the writer's and director's  portrayal of the bonding and life of Cadets and Officers  was quite moving for me. I Recommend this movie to any patriot or full blooded American who is proud of their heritage. This movie will return anyone to their American Roots. Too often we lose the correlation and connection between the nation and its military.

~

Back To Top

~

Email This Page

To A Friend.!

~

~